About your Search

20130416
20130424
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8
. a couple thoughts on this. one is faa knew this was coming for two years, had a long time plan, bat and you're seeing is controllers are being laid off at the same rate for the big facilities, as they are for the smaller ones. you think faa would say, let's see where most of the people or traveling and keep those fully staffed and be a little more surgical on the smaller airports. >> shepard: sounds like a lot of this is politics. >> does seem rather odd but i don't see the controllers behind it but the administration wants to make sure everybody feels the pain here. >> does that seem understandable to you? >> not real ly. it doesn't. this is one of our great assets in this country, the ability to move across the country, and yet the government is getting in the way of this to prove a political point. we have seen the faa budget for controllers rise 50%, and traffic is down 27%. so we're throwing more money to handle less of a problem, yet now is the time we chose to start making the american people feel the pain? it just doesn't make sense. >> shepard: the american people are already feeli
: the faa releasing a statement saying it will quote, be working with the airlines and using a comprehensive set of air traffic management tools to minimize the delays and impacts of lower staffing as we move into the busy summer season. do you find that reassuring? i'm not sure i do. good morning stuart. stuart varney from the fox business network. stuart couldn't we move money over from consultants and grants to help folks out in the control tower? >> let me spell out what we're talking about. $500 million this year for consultants. $474 million in wrapts grants to make communities more liveable and sustainable. obvious, question, martha, take some money out of the consultants bucket and put it into air traffic controlsers bucket to avoid delays. president says can't do that. i don't have the flexibility to target nonessentials. can't do it. so the republicans introduced a bill that would specifically give the president that flexibility, to avoid this pain. he threatened to veto it. that's where we stand this morning. more cuts are coming. more delays are coming. the president does not wan
as the national transportation safety board takes a closer look at one fire in particular just days after the faa approved boeing's plan to get its fleet back in the air. dan springer is live in seattle. dan? >> reporter: yeah, jon. the faa approved the battery fix even as the company answers tough questions about the fire back in january that led to the dreamliner fleet getting grounded. the plane's lithium ion battery sured a short which led to the failure of all eight cells. boeing's new plan includes a redesigned battery that has more insulation between the cells to prevent what's called thermal runaway. the battery charger has been redesigned to reduce the total amount of energy in the battery so it doesn't work as hard, and it's going to be in a better steel containment box that won't allow oxygen to fuel a fire. the ntsb put boeing on the defensive this morning about its assumptions that turned out to be wrong. >> what we can't do is we can't account for every single possible method of short circuit, particularly what we would consider the unknown unknowns. >> reporter: boeing says it has
at the airport. the f.a.a. imposing furloughs on thousands of employees. those cuts are being blamed on sequester. guess what? delays, delays, delays. >>steve: with fewer workers responsible for the same number of planes that means you're going to have to wait. here now stuart varney, we're not going to make him wait. the scare quester didn't work. now what they're trying to do is inflict pain. people are going to sit on planes, they're going to call their congressmen. "you've got to do something about it! " >> that's right. quick pop quiz. did you know the f.a.a., the people who run the air traffic system, this year they will spend $500 million on consultants, $325 million on supplies and travel, $474 million on grants to make communities more livable and sustainable. >>steve: are you saying there's money available where they don't have to furlough those guys? >> exactly. why don't you take some of that money and put it into the air traffic controllers' bucket so we don't have to have these delays? because the president says we don't have the flexibility. we cannot redirect spending. not allowed
of air traffic controllers. faa officials declined comment on the suit. >>> a member of the oakland school board will become the district's acting superintendent soon. gary yee was named a candidate for the job today. the school board is due to vote on the appointment on wednesday. yee has been on the school board since 2003 and he is in line to replace superintendent tony smith. smith is leaving because of family health issues. >> we have decided that, given the time frame that we're working with, that an acting superintendent is the right course of action at this time. >> yee is an oakland native and has worked as an educator and principal for more than 40 years. >>> residents finally allowed to return home in texas. next, newly released 911 tapes from the moments following the deadly explosion at a fertilizer plant. >>> and girl next door reese witherspoon in an unusual role what she has to say about her weekend in jail. >> hi, i'm meteorologist lawrence karnow in the kpix 5 weather center. high pressure and offshore winds, the temperatures are soaring, some places already in the
started for 47,000 f.a.a. employees. that means there are fewer air traffic controllers at airports including here in the bay area. government budget cuts are forcinged it rail agencies to -- federalagcies to endi no major flight delays in the bay area. and now to texas where tonight we are learning that the first responders who rushed in to put out the massive fire at the fertilizer plant in the small town of west paid a staggering price much higher than we initially thought. abc news reporter is there. >> today outside that massive explosion site at the texas fertilizer plant, the local sheriff told us that the first reonders who died didn't ve a chance. 14 people were killed and auies say 12 ofm we firefighters and paramedics and other, woulders there trying to -- workers trying to put out the initial fire that may have caused the explosion. >> our priority is the line of duty death investigation for the firefighters and first responders who lost their lives this this incident. >> reporter: it is one of the greatest losses of first responders since the 2007 charleston sofa factor
hill? republicans going to try to pass something specific to faa? >> does this mean they are going to try to do a every time there is a problem? >> or do you try to do the big piece? >> i have to go to shameless plugs. >> 50th anniversary for the lawyers committee. go to the website. >> we have to build a workforce. 50% of the governors out there in their state of the union addresses talk about education. >> it's a great study. i know what you are talking about. my republican polling partner did a great analysis of the state of the state education. >> it is not glamorous but essential. >> pete williams. >> here it is. that is the way to look at it. that's it for this edition of "the daily run down" we know there is potentially intriguing breaking news. tomorrow we will talk to congressman mike mccall just hours after he received a top secret briefing. >>> and taking a dive to the race for john kerry's former senate seat. chris jansing, bye-bye. at the airports not too many problems. most likely be areas like kansas city or chicago or st. louis with rain or thunderstorms moving thro
an hour long. >> reporter: the faa is blaming the delays on across-the-board budget cuts which, it says, forced it on to furlough 15,000 air traffic controllers and other workers and were spacing out flights in the name of safety. several hundred flights delayed, less than the agency's prediction of 6,700 daily flight delays. but transportation secretary ray lahood warns abc, we might see an airplane apocalypse yet. >> we did not take into account weather activities. these delays could get extended beyond the 60 to 90 minutes. >> reporter: late monday, i decided to investigate the delays myself. taking a round-trip from miami -- not bad. taking off about 25 minutes late. to orlando -- it looks like we're about to take off about 50 minutes late. not too bad given the circumstances. and back. now, a lot of folks back in there gripe that probably the airports that the politicians and congressmen use, washington national, probably didn't have too many delays. it did. delays up to two hours. airline analysts say if this persists through the summer, we could see ticket prices start to rise. r
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)